The LSUHSC New Orleans
Emergency Medicine Interest Group

Presents

The Student Procedure Manual


Wound Care and Dressings

by Gerald Falchook with
Patrick Hymel

Indications
Prerequisites
Equipment
Procedure
-Primarily closed wounds (lacerations)
-Partial thickness wounds
-Abraded skin
-Most commonly used dressings
-Cleaning
-Elevation
-Tetanus prophalaxis
Complications
Follow-up
Related Procedures/Tests
References

Indications

Prerequisites

Equipment

Procedure

Primarily closed wounds (lacerations):

Partial thickness wounds:

Abraded skin:

***In all cases, it is important to keep the wound clean and dry during the first 24-48 hours following application of the dressing.

Most commonly used dressings:

Cleaning:

Elevation:

Tetanus prophylaxis:

Table 1: Tetanus-Prone Status Identification

Clinical Features Tetanus-Prone
Wounds
Non-Tetanus-Prone Wounds
Age of Wound > 6 hours < 6 hours
Configuration Stellate wound Linear wound
Depth > 1cm < 1cm
Mechanism of injury Missile, crush, bum, frostbite Missile, crush, bum,
Signs of Infection Present Absent
Devitalized tissue Present Absent
Contaminants (dirt, feces, soil, saliva) Present Absent
Denervated and/or ischemic tissue Present Absent

Complications

Follow-up

Related Procedures/Tests:

References

  1. Emergency medicine: concepts and clinical practice. 4t' ed. Eds. Peter Rosen, Roger Barkin. Mosby-Year Books, Inc.: St. Louis, 1998.
  2. Emergency medicine: a comprehensive study guide/ American College of Emergency Physicians. 411 ed. Ed. Judith E. Tintinalli. McGraw Hill: New York,
    1996.

 


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