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Program Director

Juzar Ali, MD, FRCP(C) FCCP
Russell C. Klein MD LSU Professor of Medicine
LSU-Wetmore TB & Chest Clinics
Section of Pulmonary/Critical Care Medicine
Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center

1901 Perdido Street, MEB Suite 3205
New Orleans, LA 70112-1393 
Phone: (504) 568-4634
Fax: (504) 568-4295
Email: JALI@lsuhsc.edu

http://www.medschool.lsuhsc.edu

LSUHSC Faculty Page

 

Clinical Coordinator/ LSU-Wetmore TB Hot line: Ms Maureen Vincent : 504 638 7053 mvince@lsuhsc.edu

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Vision, Mission & Goals

It is our vision that effective community-based programs dealing with typical Tuberculosis and Atypical Tuberculosis now known as Non Tuberculous Mycobacterial Disease (NTM) or Mycobacteria other than TB (MOTT)  and Respiratory Diseases associated with these infections will result in increased awareness , improved disease control, better public health and efficient patient services in the New Orleans area. Our mission is to develop a comprehensive multi-faceted program aimed at the control of Mycobacterial infection in the Greater New Orleans metropolitan area. While complementing other community-based efforts, this program and collaboration will enhance the liaison between public health clinics, community clinics and academic centers of excellence in this field. We will play a pivotal role in the control of TB in the Greater New Orleans area and the State of Louisiana by implementing a patient-targeted, community-based public health educational program, which will benefit persons suffering from both typical and atypical TB. We will also improve patient services by developing a user-friendly database system that will combine information on patient services into one centralized location for access by health care professionals at multiple sites and avoid duplication of services.

 

 

Introduction

Tuberculosis, a disease that attacks not only the individual by breaking through his/her immune defenses, but shreds the public health infrastructure of the society, remains one of the greatest challenges this world is facing today. One third of the world’s population is infected with Tuberculosis. Although the United States continues to make progress in its control, the increasing number of immune compromised patients in the US on immune modulators  and we being a part of the world community still face this enormous public health threat.

 

question_mark Frequently Asked Questions

How is typical TB different from Atypical TB or NTM /MOTT ?
 What are the symptoms of ATYPICAL TB/NTM/MOTT
 Is Atypical TB treatable? 
 Do patients with Atypical TB need to be isolated or wear masks etc? 
 If I am told I have Atypical TB, what should I do? 
 Is the Chest X-ray in case of typical TB different from Atypical TB?

Click here for answers to common questions